March 4, 2014

CANADA STOP SEAL HUNT!

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       ★Sia Speaks Out Against Canadian Seal Slaughter

                                                 



                              





                                    
                                                                                     CANADA'S SHAME


                                                  

The hunters have vowed to proceed despite the fact that the seal population has already been devastated by global warming, which has melted the ice floes on which the mammals give birth. The lack of ice means that the seals have been forced to give birth in the water, where their pups drown.


Worldwide horror at the hunt led to a boycott of seal fur by most fashion houses and the European Union imposed a ban on certain seal products. To appease animal welfare actitivists, the sealers now try to kill the animals first by shooting them with high-powered rifles, but always carry a club to smash the skulls of any seals that are still alive. However, one group of international vets found that four out of five sealers do not check whether seals are dead before skinning them.



        

                                                                         Written by Lindsay Pollard-Post | May 9, 2014
                                                 

More than 50,000 seals have been killed already this year, and the slaughter is still going on. We may not be able to run onto the ice to stand between a baby seal and a rifle or the sharp end of a hakapik, but we can help end the massacre by calling on Canadian officials to stop the slaughter and support a government buyout. The market for seal fur is virtually non-existent, and the Fisheries Minister admitted last month that China has rejected seal meat. Please, share this video with everyone you know and speak up to end what the late, great Farley Mowat called “perhaps the most atrocious single trespass by human beings against the living world that’s taking place today.”

Read more: http://www.peta.org/blog/video-canada-seal-slaughter/#ixzz31HaPxrsO


  Seals and Sealing in Canada Govament of CANADA
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is the federal department 
responsible for managing the seal harvest. Seals are a valuable natural resource, 
and the seal harvest is an economic mainstay for numerous rural communities in
Atlantic Canada, Quebec and the North. As a time-honoured tradition, Canada’s
seal harvest provides meaningful employment to many coastal families who rely
on this practice for income. ~Govament of CANADA~

History of Exploitation

The harp seal is the basis of a traditional sealing industry in Newfoundland and the Gulf, which was well established by the early 18th century. At that time the manning of sealing stations was given as the major reason for breaking the ban on the colonization of Newfoundland. Initially seals were captured in nets set from shore, a practice which continues today in parts of Newfoundland, along the North Shore of Quebec and in southern Labrador. By the late 18th century Newfoundland fishermen owned 2 000 nets and earned half of their annual income from the sale of oil and skins.

The first step toward the development of a commercial offshore harvest was the participation in 1794 of the first wooden sailing ship to hunt seals. The schooner sealing fleet was not significant until the early years of the 19th century, but between 1825 and 1860, the heyday of the seal hunt, more than 300 schooners were sailing from St. John's and Conception Bay with crews exceeding 12 000 men. Eleven times during this period, catches of greater than 500 000 pelts were landed, the maximum being 744 000 in 1832. These catches were mainly young harp seals, but also included adults and immatures and a small number of hooded seals.

In 1863 a second advance in hunting technology occurred when steamers were used for the first time. The number of steam-powered sealing ships increased rapidly to 25 in 1880 and by 1911 all offshore sealing ships were steam-powered. The final evolution in sealing methods came in 1906 when the first steel-hulled ship, the S.S. Adventure, was fitted for the hunt.

Although the large-vessel hunt in March is well known, smaller vessels are also used to hunt seals. "Lands-men" in small boats and larger vessels up to 20 m in length (longliners) from the Magdalen Islands, the North Shore of Quebec, and Newfoundland take pups and older seals from late December to May. Harp seals are also taken in the Canadian Arctic and along the coast of west Greenland from June to August.

Despite the replacement of sailing ships with steam-powered vessels, catches of seals in the Northwest Atlantic declined substantially towards the latter part of the 19th century, averaging about 341 000 between 1863 and 1894. Beginning in 1895 harp seal catches were recorded separately and continued to decline, averaging 249 000 between 1895 and 1911, and 159 000 between 1912 and 1940.

In 1938, the large Norwegian sealing ships began to hunt the Northwest Atlantic population. Following the Second World War, during which little sealing occurred, the Norwegian fleet returned and gradually increased. By 1949 this resulted in a doubling of catching effort. Although mainly a Canadian and Norwegian industry, ships under the registry of Denmark, France, the United States, and the Soviet Union occasionally participated in the Atlantic coast hunt.

Annual catches of harp seals by ships from 1949 to 1961 averaged 185 000 young and 70 000 adults and bedlamers. In addition, the catch by landsmen from Cape Breton Island, Quebec, Newfoundland, Labrador, and West Greenland was approximately 55 000 annually. The total catch averaged 310 000 seals. Between 1961 and 197O, annual catches averaged 287 000 animals. Under quota management, introduced in 1971, harp catches for the decade 1971 - 1981 averaged 172 000 animals per year of which about 137 000 were pups. Catches in Canadian waters between 1984 and 1988, the period following the EEC ban noted earlier, have averaged about 39 000 animals. Although actual figures are not available, another 20 000 to 25 000 harp seals are still taken annually by Greenland hunters for a total of roughly 60 000 animals from the northwest Atlantic population.

The large catches of harp seals in the postwar years and the increased proportion of the catch comprised of older seals resulted in a marked decline in population size and pup production.

Although historical data are inadequate to accurately assess population size prior to 1950, it is evident that the reduction in stock size between 1950 and 1970 was approximately 50 % or from about 2.5 to 3.0 million animals in 1950 to about 1.5 million seals age one year and older in 1970.  ~Govament of CANADA~


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Our Harp Seal Skins come from Canada's East Coast. The skins are the finest quality of harp seals that Canada produces in a humane animal husbandry environment. The skins are tanned and processed in Newfoundland. We know you will be very satisfied with this quality.


    

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PETITION

Tell Canada Goose to Stop Using Fur! 

★End the Cruel Canadian Seal Hunt! 

★End the Canadian Seal Slaughter With A Federal Buyout

★Petition to End the Cruel Canadian Seal Hunt

★AGAINST BABY SEAL HUNT 

★Help Stop the Canadian Seal Hunt!

★URGE CANADA TO END ITS SHAMEFUL SEAL SLAUGHTER

★Stop Seal Slaughter in our World

★Stop Seal Hunting in Canada

★Help Stop the Seal Hunt

★SEAL PETITIONS( from Taiji List Heidi's blog) 



 
Seal Hunt Q&A
Which seals are targeted by Canada's seal hunt?
Harp seals are the primary target of the commercial seal hunt, and to a much 
smaller extent,
hooded seals are also killed. Fully 97 percent of the harp seals killed are pups under just three
months of age.

Where are the seals killed?
Canada's commercial seal hunt occurs on the ice floes off Canada's East Coast in two areas:
the Gulf of St. Lawrence (west of Newfoundland and east of the Magdalen Islands) and the
"Front" (northeast of Newfoundland).

Who kills seals and why?
Sealing is an off-season activity conducted by fishermen from Canada's East Coast. They make,
on average, a small fraction of their annual incomes from sealing—and the rest from commercial
fisheries. Even in Newfoundland, where most sealers live, the government estimates there are less
than 6,000 fishermen who actively participate in the seal hunt each year—less than one percent
of the provincial population.

How are the seals killed?
The Canadian Marine Mammal Regulations that govern the hunt stipulate sealers may kill seals
with wooden clubs, hakapiks (large, ice-pick-like clubs) and guns. In the Gulf of St. Lawrence,
clubs and hakapiks are the killing implements of choice, and in the Front, guns are more widely
used (though clubs are frequently used at the Front to kill seals who have been shot and wounded). 

How many seals are killed each year?
In recent years, hundreds of thousands of seals have been killed annually in the commercial seal
hunt. These kill levels are among the highest witnessed in Canada in half a century. The last time
seals were killed at this rate—in the 1950s and '60s—the harp seal population was reduced by as
much as two thirds.
Moreover, the actual number of seals killed is likely higher than the number reported. Many seals
are shot at and injured in the course of the hunt, and studies suggest that a significant number of
these animals slip beneath the surface of the water, where they die slowly and are never recovered.

Are there any penalties when hunters exceed the government's quota?
No. In 2002, the Canadian government knowingly allowed sealers to exceed the quota by more
than 37,000 animals. Sealers had already killed substantially more than the quota allowed by
May 15 (the regulated closing date of the seal hunt), and yet the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans
chose to extend the sealing season until June. In 2004, sealers killed close to 16,000 seals more
than the permitted quota. Again, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans extended the sealing season
until well into June.

What products are made from seals?
Seals are killed primarily for their fur, which is used to produce fashion garments and other items.
There is a small market for seal oil (both for industrial purposes and for human consumption),
and seal penises have been sold in Asian markets as an aphrodisiac. There is almost no market for
the meat, so seal carcasses are normally left to rot on the ice. Senior Canadian government
representatives define the seal slaughter as “primarily a fur hunt.”

Is the seal hunt economically important?
Sealing is an off-season activity conducted by fishermen from Canada's East Coast. They make, on
average, one twentieth of their incomes from seal hunting and the rest from commercial fisheries.
Even in Newfoundland, where most sealers live, income from the hunt accounts for less than one
percent of the province's economy and less than two percent of the landed value of the fishery.
According to the Newfoundland government, out of a population of half a million people, fewer
than 6,000 fishermen participate in the seal hunt each year.
The Canadian government could easily shut down the seal hunt and replace it with economic
alternatives should it choose to do so. One solution, which is supported by both animal protection
groups and sealers, is a federal buyout of the commercial sealing industry. This program would
involve the federal government's “buying back” sealing licenses from fishermen—compensating
them for lost revenue in the wake of the closure of the slaughter. Such a plan would be coupled
with an investment in developing economic alternatives for the communities affected.
Fishing industry buyouts are nothing new to the Canadian government—more than $4 billion has
been spent on Canada’s East Coast on buyouts and alternative economic development plans in
recent years.  When Canada ended its commercial whale hunt, it compensated whale hunters for
their licenses in a similar fashion.  One potential industry for the federal government to develop
in place of seal hunting is marine ecotourism, including seal watching. In the Magdalen Islands,
one of Canada’s sealing areas, seal watching now brings in more money to local communities
than seal hunting does.

Does the government subsidize the hunt?
Yes. According to reports from the Canadian Institute for Business and the Environment, more
than $20 million in subsidies were provided to the sealing industry between 1995 and 2001.
Those subsidies came from entities such as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Human
Resources Development Council, and Canada Economic Development–Quebec. These subsidies
take a variety of forms, including funding the salaries for seal processing plant workers, market
research and development trips, and capital acquisitions for processing plants. In 2004, more
than $400,000 was provided by the Canadian government to companies for the development of
seal products.
In recent years, millions of dollars have been spent on icebreaking for the sealing vessels and
search and rescue of sealing crews by the Canadian Coast Guard—all at taxpayers’ expense.
In 2009, the Canadian government estimated that enforcement of the Marine Mammal
Regulations cost between $1.8 and $3.6 million—for an industry that brought in less than
$1.5 million that year. The Canadian government also commits considerable resources each
year to lobbying foreign governments on behalf of the sealing industry, including overseas
flights and accommodations for lobbyists.
Moreover, Canada's commercial seal hunt is also indirectly subsidized by the Norwegian
government. A Norwegian company purchases close to 80 percent of the sealskins produced
in Canada in any given year through its Canadian subsidiary. These skins are shipped in an
unprocessed state directly to Norway, where they are tanned and re-exported. The Norwegian
government provides significant financial assistance to this company each year.

Is it true seals are jeopardizing the Canadian cod fishery?
There is no evidence to support this contention. Some fishing industry lobby groups try to claim
that seals must be culled to protect fish stocks, but nothing could be further from the truth.
The scientific community agrees that the true cause of the depletion of fish stocks off Canada's
East Coast is human over-fishing. Blaming seals for disappearing fish is a convenient way for
the fishing industry to divert attention from its irresponsible and environmentally destructive
practices that continue today.
In truth, seals, like all marine mammals, are a vital part of the ecosystem of the Northwest
Atlantic. Harp seals, which are the primary target of the hunt, are opportunistic feeders, meaning
they eat many different species. So while approximately three percent of a harp seal's diet may
be commercially fished cod, harp seals also eat many significant predators of cod, such as squid.
That is why some scientists are concerned that culling harp seals could further inhibit recovery
of commercially valuable fish stocks in the Northwest Atlantic.

Are seals overpopulated?
No.While the harp seal population in the Northwest Atlantic is the world's largest, it is
amigratory population that spans the distance between Canada and Greenland, and is
supposed to number in the many millions.
In the 1950s and '60s, over-hunting reduced the harp seal population by as much as two
thirds. By the early 1970s, senior Canadian government scientists were warning that the
population could be lost altogether if commercial sealing was not suspended for at least a
decade. In the early 1980s, the European Union banned the import of white coat seal skins,
effectively removing the principal market for the hunt at the time. For the next decade,
the numbers of seals killed in the hunt dramatically declined, and the harp seal population
began to recover. But in the 1990s, the Canadian government rejuvenated the commercial seal
hunt through massive subsidies. And with hundreds of thousands of seal pups killed in the past
five years alone, we can only wonder what the impact will be on the harp seal population in
coming years. Scientists have already sounded the alarm regarding the poor science used by
the Canadian government to set hunt quotas.

 
EXPLORE ELSEWHERE

PETITION  PLEAGE 

 

Seal Oil: The Other Seal Product
Seal oil capsules
Harp seals have a thick layer of blubber underneath their skin, which protects them from the freezing temperatures of the North Atlantic.
Harp seals, like all marine mammals, now have high levels of toxins in their blubber as a result of the pollution of the oceans with synthetic pesticides and industrial chemicals. The chemicals that are fat-soluble collect in the fatty tissues of small fish and crustacea and then are concentrated in the fatty tissues of the animals that eat these fish and crustacea. The higher the animal in the food chain, the greater the concentration of these poisons. Harp seals are high in the food chain and have high concentrations of poison, including mercury compounds, in their blubber.
Despite the high concentrations of toxins, the oil obtained from this blubber layer is sold in capsules as a nutrition supplement. The oil is reputed to taste bad, so that it is not sold for direct use in food (as flax seed oil, hemp seed oil, and chia seed oil are). If advanced separation processes are not implemented, or if they are insufficient, dangerous concentrations of these toxins will remain in the oil sold in these capsules.

Seal oil capsules

Harp seals have a thick layer of blubber underneath their skin, which protects them from the freezing temperatures of the North Atlantic.


Harp seals, like all marine mammals, now have high levels of toxins in their blubber as a result of the pollution of the oceans with synthetic pesticides and industrial chemicals. The chemicals that are fat-soluble collect in the fatty tissues of small fish and crustacea and then are concentrated in the fatty tissues of the animals that eat these fish and crustacea. The higher the animal in the food chain, the greater the concentration of these poisons. Harp seals are high in the food chain and have high concentrations of poison, including mercury compounds, in their blubber.


Despite the high concentrations of toxins, the oil obtained from this blubber layer is sold in capsules as a nutrition supplement. The oil is reputed to taste bad, so that it is not sold for direct use in food (as flax seed oil, hemp seed oil, and chia seed oil are). If advanced separation processes are not implemented, or if they are insufficient, dangerous concentrations of these toxins will remain in the oil sold in these capsules.


 

A Chinese vendor (okokchina) deceives customers about the toxins in seal blubber with this misinformation:


"Seal Oil is "Bio-filtered" Fish Oil

As seals are much higher in the food chain than fish, seals use their digestive system to filter out

the many natural impurities found in fish."


NuTan Furs, formerly known as Atlantic Marine Products, was a major purveyor of harp seal oil (along with pelts), until it shut down (and was essentially 'acquired' by Carino) in 2012. This company was owned by the large seafood distributor, the Barry Group.


One company that uses harp seal oil (and in the past, purchased it from Atlantic Marine Products) is Terra Nova Fishery Products, founded by Dr. Cosmas Ho, a Newfoundland researcher and entrepreneur. If you wish to comment on his line of research, you can email him here. Another brand of seal oil capsules is Omega 3 Plus+.


You can help the seals by alerting those who take omega-3 supplements about the origins of these products.


Smuggling of Seal Oil Capsules


Note that neither company sells to the U.S. (legally) because all marine mammal products, including harp seal oil and pelts, are prohibited in the U.S. thanks to the Marine Mammal Protection Act.


Nevertheless, smuggling of seal oil capsules into the U.S. (and perhaps other countries with bans) is occurring. In most cases in the U.S., this contraband is found in Asian grocery stores.


If you see seal oil capsules in the United States (sometimes marketed as marine oil capsules), please take a picture of the bottle, note the name and address of the store, and contact the NOAA Office of Law Enforcement at 1-800-853-1964 or the National Marine Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement at (301) 427-2300 or contact harpseals.org. If you see smuggled harp seal oil in other countries with bans on seal product imports, please contact harpseals.org. 

◎Join the Seal Action Team! Sign up here to help end the slaughter of harp seals and other seals with Harpseals.org.

http://www.harpseals.org/help/seal_action_team/index.php





                                


There are three reasons that seals have been hunted in Canada: cultural reasons, economic reasons, and political reasons.  Those who hunt seal for cultural purposes – including Inuit hunters and those Newfoundlanders looking for a feed of flippers for supper, are not threatened by the EU ban or any other legislation, and this type of sealing seems likely to continue for as long as it is sustainable. 


The economic reasons for continuing to commercially hunt seals are all but gone. Thirty years of efforts to try and realize a Chinese market for seal products have failed. Sealing is not a significant economic opportunity  for Atlantic Canadians, nor can it realistically be expected to become one.


This is, after all, the 21st century and the products made from seals are largely unnecessary . And yet, the federal government continues to waste tax dollars on support for the hunt, which in recent years has provided only part-time employment for fewer than 500 sealers.


The only type of sealing that remains in Canada is that done for political purposes. 


The seal hunt is supported by Canadian politicians who think it will help them win votes in eastern Canada, facilitated by a private Norwegian company that is happy to take Canadian government funds, and conducted  by individuals that continue this dangerous activity based on the false promises made to them by these politicians, in the hopes of earning a few hundred (or if they are fortunate – thousand) dollars.


There has to be a better way. 


Regardless of the WTO Panel’s ultimate ruling, the EU is not going to suddenly start importing seal products. The world does not appear to want – nor need – products made from dead seals, and the only ones profiting from the current situation are the politicians. 


IFAW is willing to work with sealers and sealing communities towards fair and just compensation for those affected by the death of this industry. Sealers can continue to complain about the past, place blame on NGOs, and look to governments for more handouts - but if history is any indication this is not going to change anything.  


We will see more false hopes, more trade bans, more taxes wasted. Like commercial whaling, the commercial seal hunt needs to end once and for all.


It’s time to move on, and with Canadians’ resourcefulness and some innovative thinking, I know we can do better.

                                   

                                  

                                  

                                   

                                    

                                     

                               
                                
               
                               
                               
                               
                               


 THANK YOU VIST HERE! 
                     Keiko Olds


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